MODULE 2 OVERVIEW

MODULE CHECK IN

How many different instrument sounds are in a song? Your students may be surprised with the number of tracks in the Entrepreneur song. Students will dig deeper into both the "layers" of racism and music in this module and start to add their own tracks to their song using the fitMedia() function. 

OBJECTIVE

Students will examine the “layers” of both racism and music and will code instrumental layers in their song using variables and functions.

MAKE BEATS

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Songs are created by layering many different sounds (“tracks”) on top of each other.

LEARN CODE

A variable is a unit of storage that creates a space in the computer’s memory to store data.

A function is a piece of code that you can easily call over and over again.

fitMedia()  is a function that adds audio clips to a track and uses four parameters (or arguments) - (sound clip, track, starting measure, ending measure)

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PROMOTE EQUITY

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Racial injustice takes place interpersonally, institutionally, and structurally. 

These injustices make it harder for Black entrepreneurs to achieve success.

Create clearly named variables that represent different data types and perform operations on their values. (6-8)

Design and iteratively develop computational artifacts for practical intent, personal expression, or to address a societal issue by using events to initiate instructions. (9-10)

Construct solutions to problems using student-created components, such as procedures, modules and/or objects. (11-12)

Complete all student work as a student:

Review the OUTKAST Imagination Rubric, read verse 1 of the lyrics, and watch the video, Verse 1 Decoded.

Review definitions of structural, interpersonal, and institutional racism.

Review the EarSketch platform. Practice searching the sound browser for Pharrell sound clips. Create a sample script and try to insert the fitMedia() function. Click here to review these concepts. 

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Duplicate the Day 2 Exit Ticket Form

Print and distribute (or post in online resources/Google Classroom) Student Workbook

The teacher guide follows the student workbook

Students will use Workbook Pages 8-11 on Day 2

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Advanced Users: If your students are experienced EarSketch users, please review the sample code for Day 2 (Advanced EarSketch) and provide students with guidelines for completing the code.

All students will need to have access to a computer with an internet connection. EarSketch will not work on mobile devices. The site earsketch.gatech.edu will need to be whitelisted by your district IT department.

DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCES

RECOMMENDED PACING

0 - 7 minutes: Engage - Lyric Analysis

7 - 21 minutes: Explore - Layers of Racism

21 - 30 minutes: Explain - Layers of Music

30 - 55 minutes: Elaborate - Sound Bank with Variables, fitMedia()

55 - 60 minutes: Evaluate - Exit Ticket

WELCOME

back students!

Today is Module 2 of the Your Voice Is Power Learning Experience. We will continue to investigate how music, computer science, and entrepreneurship are pathways to promote racial equity, and you’ll continue to gain skills to help you code your final song for the competition.”

Today, you will examine the “layers” of both racism and music and will code instrumental layers in their song.

TODAY'S WARM UP

To warm up today, we will be playing the second set of lyrics in Verse 1 as you follow along in your Student Notebook on page 8. As I play the lyrics, record what you think you hear Pharrell saying/meaning in these lines.

Listen to Verse 1 of Entrepreneur

Entrepreneur - Verse 1
00:00 / 00:23

What are your initial reactions to what you hear in Verse 1, including both the messaging and music? 

Share your thoughts and reactions with the entire class.

Student Workbook page 8

VERSE 1

In this position with no choice

A system imprison young black boys

Distract with white noise

The brainwashed become hype boys

Third eye dilate

You wasn't supposed to make it off Section Eight

Prepare to risk everything

Robbin' Peter just to pay Paul

CLASS THOUGHTS

What are your initial reactions to what you hear in Verse 1?

LYRIC ANALYSIS

Let's dive deeper past our initial impressions of Verse 1 to analyze the lyrics using the OUTKAST Imagination Rubric. We will be breaking down the verse by focusing on a pair of lines and identifying the principle from the OUTKAST Imagination Rubric that best fits with each pair of lines. 

Decode the meaning of Pharrell's lyrics in Verse 1 using the OUTKAST Imagination Framework. Click on each set of lyrics and its respective section in the graphic organizer to compare your answers to an example of how the lyrics can fit into the OUTKAST Imagination framework and an interpretation of what they lyrics might mean.

Which principles from OUTKAST Imagination best fits with each pair of lines? What message is being told through the whole verse? How do the lyrics, layered on one another, change the meaning? How does the music/instrumentals add another layer to the message?

TIP

Need a reminder of what the OUTKAST Imagination Rubric is? Click to see the rubric.

Student Workbook page 4

DECODE THE MESSAGE

Which principles from OUTKAST Imagination best fits with each pair of lines?

VERSE 1

In this position with no choice

A system imprison young black boys

Distract with white noise

The brainwashed become hype boys

Third eye dilate

You wasn't supposed to make it off Section Eight

Prepare to risk everything

Robbin' Peter just to pay Paul

What message is being told through the whole verse?

How do the lyrics, layered on one another, change the meaning?

How do the lyrics, layered on one another, change the meaning?

Let's take a look at what Dr. Wilson has to say about these lyrics.

Entrepreneur Breakdown - Verse 1

2:30

LESSON

 

BUILD YOUR TOOLBOX

Previously, we discussed what racism was. Today, we are diving into the different types (or layers) of racism and how they show up in everyday life. As we go through each, please take notes on page 9 in your Student Notebook. 

DEFINING THE LAYERS OF RACISM

There are 3 types of racism: Interpersonal racism, institutional racism, and systemic or strucutral racism

STRUCTURAL

INSTITUTIONAL

INTERPERSONAL

Record the key terms and definitions into your Student Workbook.

Student Workbook page 4

TERM

DEFINITION

EXAMPLES

Occurs between individuals as personal interactions

Interpersonal racism is the racial bias that occurs when individuals interact with others and their personal racial beliefs affect their interactions. It is the exercise of personal prejudice that demeans, hurts, or harms communities of color.

Occurs within institutions and systems of power

Institutional racism describes the unfair policies and discriminatory practices of particular institutions (schools, workplaces, etc.) that routinely produce racially inequitable outcomes for people of color and advantages for White people. Individuals within institutions take on the power of the institution when they reinforce racial inequities.

Racial bias among institutions and across society

Structural racism involves the cumulative and compounding effects of an array of societal factors, including the history, culture, ideology, and interactions of institutions and policies that systematically privilege White people and disadvantage people of color.

What are other examples of interpersonal, institutional, and structural racism?

Optional: Quick Class Discussion

<30 seconds for each example type

IDENTIFYING THE TYPES OF RACISM

Let's work together to dissect how interpersonal, institutional, and structural/systemic racism are at play within a few recent national events.

In groups of 3-4 students, read through an article (accessible to students in the Student Workbook) and discuss the following:

What happened (include details)? What type of racism does this instance represent?

GROUP

NAMES

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

ARTICLE

Media

Media

Police Brutality

Police Brutality

Hate Crimes

Hate Crimes

Bank

Bank

Complete the graphic organizer as you analyze racism in current events.

Student Workbook page 4

NATIONAL

EXAMPLE

WHAT HAPPENED?

WHAT TYPE/S OF RACISM? WHY?

MEDIA

POLICE

BRUTALITY

HATE CRIMES

BANK

What interpersonal, institutional, and systemic barriers do Black entrepreneurs face?

Optional: Open Discussion

INTRODUCTION TO LAYERING MUSIC

Now that we've explored the layers of racism, we are going to explore the layers that exist within music. 

How many different instruments and sounds do you think were used to create the Entrepreneur song?

Let's find out how many different instruments and sounds were used! 

Layering in Music

8:06

Can you believe how many layers of instruments and sounds were used to create the song? So awesome!

Today, you will be learning how to do exactly what Chalece did. You will import sounds into your song and use the function, fitMedia(), to code at least 5 tracks to create a short song. 

Before we move on, write down today's key term, "Track", into your Student Notebook.

Student Workbook page 5

TERM

DEFINITION

A part of a song that is recorded separately as a musical clip and added to a piece of music. In a DAW, tracks are arranged in rows and labeled with numbers.

EXPLORING SOUND LIBRARY

Today, we will be coding the intro to our song. You will code five tracks in your code editor and then get to see them in your Digital Audio Workstation, just like Chalece and Mike. Before we get started, we need to create a #SOUNDBANK with all our favorite sounds that we will use in our song. You can find sound clips from genres, such as R&B, Hip Hop, EDM, House, Pop, Funk (and many more), and from other 300 different instrument samples. In addition to Pharrell, we have sound clips from recording artists and sound engineers, such as Ciara, Common, Richard Devine, and Young Guru.

 

To get started, you have 4 minutes to find your favorite drum and vocal sounds, and paste them in the code editor, below the label #SOUND BANK VARIABLES. Later, you will get to pick out even more sounds to add in!  

Open your web browser (we recommend Chrome or Firefox) and follow the directions to get started. 

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Go to the EarSketch Platform and log into your EarSketch account.

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Go to the Sound Library (heaphone icon in the left-hand menu).

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Find a drum and a vocal sound.

You can search by artist, genre, or instrument. Entrepreneur sounds are located at the top of the sound collections. (Click the green play button to listen to the sound).

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After finding your sounds, click on the line below #SOUND BANK VARIABLES. Then, click the BLUE CLIPBOARD to paste it into your code editor. (Click the ORANGE STAR to save the sound as your favorite).

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Repeat for your second sound.

DEFINING #SOUNDBANK WITH VARIABLES

Did you have fun listening to the awesome beats in the sound browser? Were you able to choose just two favorite sounds and paste them in the code editor? 

You may have noticed that the sounds you chose have pretty long names. For example, one of our favorite drum sounds has the name: ENTREP_BEAT_DRUMBEAT. This would be a lot to type over and over again in our script. 

Do we have to write the whole name each time? 

No, we don't! Luckily, we can use "variables" to give our favorite sounds nicknames to selected sounds to make it easier to keep track of our favorite beats. This allows us to use them over and over again in our code without having to type such a long name (and it also keeps us from making spelling errors).

Click to reveal and write the term in your Student Workbook.

Student Workbook page 5

TERM

DEFINITION

A unit of storage that creates a space in the computer's memory to store data

A variable is a unit of storage that can be changed to represent a value. To use variables, we need to give the variable a name and assign it to a value. Let's take our favorite drum sound, ENTREP_BEAT_DRUMBEAT, and assign it to the variable: drum. We can then use the variable, drum, to represent ENTREP_BEAT_DRUMBEAT throughout our code. 

The variable is defined using the = as an assignment operator. We will be looking at how variables can represent sound clips in this module and numbers in future modules. 

Why should we assign sound clips to a variable?

TIPS

Click to see possible answers as to why we should use variables and what the purpose of variables are.

Now, let's assign the two sounds you chose to your sound bank by using variables. 

Find #SOUND BANK VARIABLES in your Code Editor and assign the two sounds you chose to your sound bank by using variables.

 

The variable name should reflect the sound clip and use the = operator. If there are multiple sounds of the same instrument, we can use a number after the name to identify the variable; i.e., drum1, vox1.